Thursday, 28 September 2017

Sense And Sensibility by Jane Austen + Free book


Sense And Sensibility by Jane Austen
First published in England by Egerton in January 1811.

I read my first Jane Austen book, Persuasion, in January, having previously only watched TV or film adaptations. Realising that 2017 is the 200th anniversary year of Austen's death, I challenged myself to read all six of her novels within the year. If you would like to join my Jane Austen Challenge 2017, feel welcome to download the above badge and link up!

Where to buy this book:

Abebooks

Alibris

Amazon UK FREE

Amazon US FREE

Kobo

Smashwords

Speedyhen

The Book Depository

Waterstones

Wordery


How I got this book:
Downloaded the ebook from Amazon

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

After the death of their father, sisters Elinor and Marianne Dashwood face financial ruin. At the mercy of their half brother, John, and his greedy wife, their only hope is to make a good match. But reduced circumstances make courtship difficult—especially after being turned out of their home. While responsible Elinor takes a practical approach to matters of the heart, Marianne throws herself in unreservedly.
In Jane Austen’s first novel, two of literature’s most iconic characters discover that love demands a balance of passion and pragmatism.

I noted when I read Mansfield Park in March that, had I begun my Jane Austen Challenge with that novel, I almost certainly would not have gone on to read any of her others. Well, had I chosen to read them in order and started with Sense And Sensibility I definitely would not have continued! I really struggled to finish this novel because it is verrrrry sloooow.

There are redeeming moments of course and I accept that I am probably in a minority of people who were underwhelmed with this much-loved classic. I did feel that Sense And Sensibility started out well. I enjoyed the interactions between John and Fanny Dashwood and both Mrs Dashwood and Mrs Jennings are fun. Unfortunately they are only supporting characters though so not on the page enough to liven up endless rounds of pseudo-polite chitchat with little plot to drive the narrative in between. As a hundred page novella, I think Sense And Sensibility would have kept my attention and been a satisfying read. Drawn out over more than twice that length however, it failed. Fingers crossed that Emma and Northanger Abbey are more to my taste!


Search Lit Flits for more:
Books by Jane Austen / Women's fiction / Books from England

No comments:

Post a Comment