Wednesday, 17 January 2018

The Path to the Lake by Susan Sallis


The Path to the Lake by Susan Sallis
First published in the UK by Bantam in 2009.

Where to buy this book:


How I got this book:
Swapped for at a campsite book exchange

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Viv's marriage to David was not a conventional one, but when he died - in an accident for which she blamed herself - it was as if her whole world had collapsed around her. She escaped by running, mainly around the nearby lake, which was once a popular place of recreation but was now desolate and derserted . It became both her refuge and her dread.

But through the misery she made some unexpected friends - a couple in the village whose family needed her as much as she needed them. And gradually, as a new life opened up, she could confront the terrible secrets which had haunted her and which could now be laid to rest.

My first Susan Sallis novel and on the strength of this tale, probably my last too. I chose it as the main character, Viv, was described as a runner. As a runner myself (at the time of reading) I thought I would identify with her because it's not often novelised women get such an independent and active interest. However, it soon became clear that running was purely a symptom of Viv's grief at her husband's death and, as she began to recover, she swiftly gave it up in favour of babies and obsessional Victoria Sponge baking. 'Proper' things for a woman to do.

The Path To The Lake does have a few good minor characters, particularly Jinx and the monosyllabic Mick Hardy, but the leads are flat and difficult to sympathise with. The supernatural element didn't work for me and I didn't understand the door knob at all. Oh, and the tying-up of loose ends at the end is so contrived as to be laughable. Except it's not funny.


Search Lit Flits for more:
Books by Susan Sallis / Women's fiction / Books from England

2 comments:

  1. That's too bad about the two stars! And about the feminine hobbies, lol xD ouch.

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    1. lol, yes. I really don't get on with this style of women's fiction!

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